2017 A Cerebral Affair Gala

 


BIGGEST NIGHT OF THE YEAR FOR BRAIN ANEURYSM'S LIVES UP TO ITS BILLING AS HUNDREDS OF SPECTATORS GATHER IN NEW YORK CITY FOR INSPIRATIONAL, MOVING FUNDRAISER


Overlooking the sunset on the iconic Hudson River in Chelsea Piers, on Thursday, September 21 a couple hundred people gathered in support of one cause – saving lives from brain aneurysms. The Lisa Colagrossi Foundation’s annual fundraising gala, A Cerebral Affair, has quickly emerged as the biggest night of the year for the brain aneurysm industry. Now in its second year, the gala drew in well over 250 people from across the nation, and across the spectrum of those affected by this affliction.

As one of the most devastating equalizers, brain aneurysms do not discriminate in terms of who they strike. The gala represented this gamut, but more importantly, it represented the dedication and generosity of those who have chosen to help make a difference in the lives of others by sharing their stories, honoring loved ones, and donating to effect change for those who have not yet been affected.

The industry’s top neurosurgeons and hospital leadership stood side-by-side with brain aneurysm survivors and those who have lost loved ones. Hollywood stars, television actors, Grammy and Tony award-winners and representatives from the sports and entertainment worlds (many of whom have become ambassadors for the Foundation) joined forces with The Lisa Colagrossi Foundation to raise awareness, including The Soprano’s Vincent Curatola, former NLF players Tommie Harris (who lost his wife) and Eric Coleman , ESPN’s Don LaGreca and others.

The evening opened with special messages from David Muir, anchor for ABC World News Tonight, actor Kevin Sorbo (Hercules), Robin Roberts from Good Morning America, Coach John Harbaugh of the NFL's Baltimore Ravens and more.  As they spoke they electrified the crowd and set the stage for events that would unfold throughout the evening including two very special tributes. 

Those attending felt the words of former James Bond girl and brain aneurysm survivor, Maryam D’Abo, as she described  her traumatic ordeal and recovery and those of the parents of former NFL player Konrad Reuland as they paid tribute to their son whose life was lost to a brain aneurysm in only December of last year. They performed, they spoke, and they paid tribute. Although somber at times, the evening itself drew life from the hope and excitement of so many people coming together to make a difference, in the hopes that one day someone may avoid losing their life to a brain aneurysm.